Health — 01 August 2013

By Richard Lenti

A network of arteries supplying blood flow to the brain is more likely to be incomplete in people who suffer migraines, according to a new study by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, published in the journal PLOS One,  found that abnormal arteries triggered migraines in more than two out of three people who suffer from them.

“People with migraine actually have differences in the structure of their blood vessels – this is something you are born with,” said the study’s lead author, Brett Cucchiara, MD, an associate professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania.

woman-with-headache1-178x300“These differences seem to be associated with changes in blood flow in the brain, and it’s possible that these changes may trigger migraine, which may explain why some people, for instance, notice that dehydration triggers their headaches.”

Read more at National Pain Report.

Share

About Author

Richard Lenti

Richard Lenti has worked as a news writer for the last 20 years at various television stations in Los Angeles. He is a Golden Mike winner and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. With roots in print journalism, Richard is excited to be “published” once again; having people read his work as opposed to having it read to them. As a freelance writer his work has appeared in the Easy Reader, L.A. Jazz Scene, Irrigation and Green Industry, and the KCAL 9 Online website.

(0) Readers Comments

Comments are closed.