Chronic Pain — 05 September 2013

By Richard Lenti

The use of medical marijuana to treat pain and other symptoms associated with cancer and chemotherapy shows promising results, according to Israeli researchers who say many patients found they needed fewer painkillers.

In an eight week study of 131 cancer patients who used cannabis, published in the journalEvidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, researchers reported significant improvement across a range of symptoms.

“All cancer or anti-cancer treatment-related symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, mood disorders, fatigue, weight loss, anorexia, constipation, sexual function, sleep disorders, itching, and pain had significant improvement,” wrote lead author Gil Bar-Sela, of the Integrated Oncology and Palliative Care Unit, Rambam Health Care Campus in Haifa.

“The population of the prolonged users in the current study reported significant improvement in all aspects of supportive and palliative oncology care.”

What makes this small study unique is its emphasis on medical marijuana, as opposed to synthetic cannabis, which is what researchers say is usually used during clinical studies.

Nearly one in three patients who used medical marijuana reported significant relief from cancer related pain and discomfort.

Read more at National Pain Report.

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About Author

Richard Lenti

Richard Lenti has worked as a news writer for the last 20 years at various television stations in Los Angeles. He is a Golden Mike winner and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. With roots in print journalism, Richard is excited to be “published” once again; having people read his work as opposed to having it read to them. As a freelance writer his work has appeared in the Easy Reader, L.A. Jazz Scene, Irrigation and Green Industry, and the KCAL 9 Online website.

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